Green beans – one ingredient, five ways

Taste June 2015

Known as string beans, snap beans and haricots verts, green beans provide fresh flavor and a superb crunch in summer dishes. Plus they contain a welcome mix of nutrients, including vitamins A, C and K and good amounts of fiber, folate and manganese. When selecting green beans, look for crisp beans free of blemishes or signs of wilting. You’ll find organic green beans in PCC stores throughout June; keep your eyes peeled for our local crop of beans from Rents Due Ranch in Stanwood, Wash., arriving in July.

 

Parmesan Green Bean Fries

Transform green beans into crispy “fries” by dusting them with Parmesan cheese, garlic powder, salt and pepper and baking them in the oven until they’re golden and crunchy. Dip them in ketchup or aioli, or eat them all on their own.

Pasta Shells with Green Beans and Pistachio Pesto

Pistachios offer a bright, sweet counterpoint to the earthiness of green beans as well as vibrant color and delicious texture in this pasta dish. While fantastic hot, the dish can be served as a cool picnic side.

Wheat Berry Salad with Green Beans and Chèvre

Crisp-tender green beans are a great match for chewy wheat berries and creamy chèvre in this hearty summer dish that is a perfect potluck contribution. Red onions, cherry tomatoes and a lemon-marjoram vinaigrette add extra punch.

Aloo Beans Subzi

Translated as “Potatoes and Green Beans,” this Indian dish is simmered in warming spices such as cumin, ginger, turmeric and cayenne or paprika, and garnished with cilantro for a flavorful side any night of the week.

Green Bean, Walnut and Chicken Salad

This fresh twist on chicken salad features a Dijon vinaigrette and plenty of fresh green beans. Take it to the beach or your favorite park along with a loaf of crusty bread, or serve it as a light lunch atop mixed greens.

 

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