Thinley reports from D.C.

This article was originally published in August 2009

(August 2009) — PCC Fremont produce worker, Thinley Gyatso, says an amazing amount was accomplished in two days of lobbying in Washington, D.C. for Tibetan freedom.

Thinley was one of 150 delegates from across the country who met with Senators Cantwell and Murray and other legislators.

After a series of meetings, the House of Representatives passed a resolution, 422 to 1, calling on China “to cease its repression of the Tibetan people” and grant them autonomy. The state department already is negotiating to establish a U.S. consulate in Tibet’s capital city of Lhasa before allowing more Chinese consulates to be built here in the United States.

Thinley says, “All the leaders on Capitol Hill received the Tibetan lobbyists honorably, listened intently, and participated earnestly in our discussions.”

Thinley is vice president of the Tibetan Healing Fund, which provides health care and education for rural Tibetan children and families. If you’d like to support its work, donations are accepted at www.tibetanhealingfund.org.

Also in this issue

Choosing farms to save: the basics of good soil and water

Quite often, the PCC Farmland Trust is asked about the criteria for projects. Are we interested in saving large or small farms? Do we have regions of priority? Are we interested in working on the east side or the west side of the mountains? To all of these, we answer yes.

Food safety at home

Here’s a fact that may surprise you: 60 percent of the cases of foodborne illness originate in home kitchens! Fast food hamburgers contaminated with e-coli and peanut butter tainted with salmonella get the most press, but some of the most harmful bacteria fester at home.